I used to be a JW! Shocking, I know

by NewChapter 76 Replies latest watchtower beliefs

  • puffthedragon
    puffthedragon

    Yea NC, I think we are all a little [email protected]#$ed up from being J-dubs. I went to nearly every meeting an never missed service until I was 25. Pio-sneer, MS and Bethel Slave all included. My wake up moment was when they kicked me out of Bethel for stupid shit after all my years of service and wanted to encourage me to start "reaching out" again right away. I told them not to hold their breath, been there done that, and I didn't care if I ever got appointed again, that having a job in the congregation didn't make me feel magically closer to Jehovah. They realized that if I didn't care about privledges that they had no hold over me and quickly lost intrest in me and so my fade began.

    When I was gone long enough, I discovered weed, sex and real friends and now when JW's ask me how I'm doing (with that pitiful look cause they are expecting me to say I'm sad, lonely and depressed) I tell them that I am doing better than ever and I am happier with my whole life then I have ever been before. The ones who were my real friends are happy for me, and even seem jealous, the others are mad and assume I am doing all sorts of "unchristian" things.

  • palmtree67
    palmtree67

    ((( Chappy-kins )))

    You're beating your pretty and intelligent head against a brick wall of ignorance. It's making your scarlet breast ache.

    Trust me. Been there, done that, now I have to wear the t-shirt. And it's an ugly t-shirt.

  • panhandlegirl
    panhandlegirl

    Former President Ronald Reagan was a Democrat before he changed parties and became a Republican and most people trusted his judgement. So people can change their mind about what they believe. John Stossel was a

    Liberal before he became a Libertarian. That may not equal the "former jw" stigma, I'm not sure. Does the "Fool me once, it's your fault, fool me twice, it's my fault" adage count in this instance?

  • mindseye
    mindseye

    I think a person's experience as a Witness usually gives them an unique insight. Typically the average Ex-JW has experienced multiple sides of life, being in a form of fundamentalism and seeing the worst side of religion, then usually rejecting religion altogether and appreciating the value of critical thought. When going to college, I found that many were just going through the motions to get their degree. Because of my background, I appreciated the chance to develop critical thinking skills.

    I've also found that when holding a strong opinion - typically in a political debate - that some of my non-JW relatives have used my JW background against me, targeting a strong opinion they disagree with on 'that type of thinking you learned as a witness.' It really is a cheap shot, and an ad hominem attack. Instead of addressing the argument, some resort to attacking the background of the person.

    In the end, I would say that my background has strenghtened my perspective, but also showed me the dangers of 'certainty'. There really is no final solution (and shouldn't be). We're all just figuring it out as we go along.

  • NewChapter
    NewChapter

    that some of my non-JW relatives have used my JW background against me, targeting a strong opinion they disagree with on 'that type of thinking you learned as a witness.' It really is a cheap shot, and an ad hominem attack.

    It is a cheap shot and ad hominem attack. But people I know that were never JW's don't often use this against me. Unfortunately, it is more commonly lobbed by fellow ex-JW's. Sad really. We have come so far, and they feel the need to continually counsel us and throw in our faces that we once made a mistake. But there you have it. And it keeps happening lately.

    NC

  • sizemik
    sizemik

    Wot nugget and the Wizard said . . .

    The only people qualified to invoke Cofty's law are ex-JW. The people least equipped to make such a judgement are ex-JW's.

    Work that one out.

  • NewChapter
    NewChapter

    Sizemik, have I told you lately that you lack faith? We don't have to work it out, silly, it will work itself out.

  • mindseye
    mindseye

    NC wrote: It is a cheap shot and ad hominem attack. But people I know that were never JW's don't often use this against me. Unfortunately, it is more commonly lobbed by fellow ex-JW's.

    Yeah, the ones that did it to me briefly attended the kingdom hall and were around witnesses long enough to know the culture (they "grew up around the truth", to use a witness phrase). It was nothing especially malicious, just something they said in the heat of the moment - but a sucky move nonetheless.

    Sad really. We have come so far, and they feel the need to continually counsel us and throw in our faces that we once made a mistake.

    Yeah, I think it's a douchebag move to throw anyone's mistake in their face during an argument. Everyone's made mistakes during their lives. And no one is the same person they were years ago. So when someone attacks you or your background while arguing a topic, that means that they're losing the argument.

  • sizemik
    sizemik
    Sizemik, have I told you lately that you lack faith?

    No . . . but thanks for the compliment.

  • FlyingHighNow
    FlyingHighNow

    Nothing wrong with passionate opinions.

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