What the &*%# (bleep) do we know?

by Navigator 46 Replies latest social entertainment

  • MegaDude
    MegaDude
    This movie is horrible

    LOL. This coming from someone who thought "The Butterfly Effect" was one of the top films of 2004.

    You just can't trust anyone who drinks Blue Smurf Piss and snorts Aspartame with impunity.

  • drwtsn32
    drwtsn32

    LMFAO!

    Well there's a difference, Megadude! Butterfly Effect doesn't pretend to be real science!

    Several things bugged me about the *! movie. Remember how they said the Native Americans literally couldn't see Columbus' ship because they never saw something like that before? Think about that for a moment. Does that make *any* sense?

    What about the whole concept of us making our own reality? If that were true, how could any of us interact with one another? We'd all have our own unique realities, afterall!

    That's just the beginning of my criticisms.

    But I will say something good about it: It had an interesting story line and special effects. lol

  • MegaDude
    MegaDude
    Remember how they said the Native Americans literally couldn't see Columbus' ship because they never saw something like that before? Think about that for a moment. Does that make *any* sense?

    Why did Aztecs see Cortez as a god and not just a man with a small army of soldiers they could easily kill? Perception. And perception can have a devastating impact on us whether right or wrong, real or imagined. At least that's the point I thought the film was trying to make, which I enjoyed.

    I agree there were some major problems with the film, the least of which was using a well-known channeler as an authority, but I liked many aspects of the film. My favorite piece was the water crystal photography. Whether it is true or not I don't know but the concept intrigued me. The value I got from the film was to be more disciplined in my thoughts as they can have real-world effects that can be very good or very bad. For that I enjoyed it. At least more than Ashton Kutchner's bad acting.

  • drwtsn32
    drwtsn32
    Why did Aztecs see Cortez as a god and not just a man with a small army of soldiers they could easily kill? Perception. And perception can have a devastating impact on us whether right or wrong, real or imagined. At least that's the point I thought the film was trying to make, which I enjoyed.

    I agree with what you say above, but that is not at all what the movie was saying. It said the native Americans literally *could not* see the ships. They saw NOTHING out there. Only after careful scrutiny could the "wise man" start to discern the ships. Total rubbish!

    The value I got from the film was to be more disciplined in my thoughts as they can have real-world effects that can be very good or very bad.
    Interesting, maybe. But not based in reality at all. Quantum physics does not grant us some mystical power to "think" things into reality.

    At least more than Ashton Kutchner's bad acting.
    LOL! Was it really that bad? I thought he did great!
  • Markfromcali
    Markfromcali

    Ashton Kutchner in: "MegaDude, Where's My Car?"

  • MegaDude
    MegaDude

    [email protected]. I'm waiting for the movie "Doc, Where's My Smurf Juice!"

    Doc,

    I would have to see the film again to appreciate your point about not seeing the ships. People's mental context or framework prevents them from seeing things as they are many times. They simply delete real data they see with their own eyes or hear with their own ears if it serves some personal purpose, conscious or unconscious. Any short conversation with a JW can make you see that. I thought that was the point you were talking about in the film.

    Interesting, maybe. But not based in reality at all. Quantum physics does not grant us some mystical power to "think" things into reality.

    Well, not purely by just thinking and no action, but action usually follows thought. Or perhaps better said, energy follows thought. I do find from my own personal experiences that thought brings about some amazing coincidences, and I don't believe in coincidence.

    I'll give you an example. One of my wishes is to help people from getting involved in Jehovah's Witnesses or get out of it. For whatever reason, I felt this "wish" very intensely over the last couple of years. I don't know why it became intense at that time but it was, but perhaps it was stimulated by reading the board a lot back then. "Coincidentally" I began running into JWs all over the place. At my aunt's condo when I was vacationing in California, my house, my street, a full restaurant with one open table...right next to a JW who was trying to convert her friend from work. (I barged into the conversation), the following week at my gym where a woman picked the treadmill next to mine and pulled out an Awake magazine when all the treadmills were open early in the a.m.

    By far the most "coincidental" experience was driving to the courthouse in my hometown and looking for a court reporter that would give me some advice on doing a new kind of transcript that I had to get out. I didn't know any reporters there so I checked the marquee in the courthouse and began knocking on random doors of court reporters. There were three floors with court rooms. About the third door I knocked on I met a lady court reporter who would help me and had time. Guess what. She was studying with the JWs. We ended up having a two-hour discussion about the dangers of the Watchtower.

    What I'm saying is my personal belief is there is a very natural process or structure that exists that we don't fully understand that involves thought manifesting into a reality. Nothing "mystical" about it unless you want to use that word to describe a very natural process or system we don't understand. But I'd agree with you that simply sitting and wishing something to manifest will not bring it about.

  • drwtsn32
    drwtsn32

    Interesting experiences, Megadude!

    Still, that movie takes things to an extreme. The movie talked about literally altering/creating your own reality with your thoughts. From what you said in the last sentence of your post, I think we actually agree on that point.

    Again, with the ships...it wasn't that the native americans didn't *comprehend* what they were seeing. (That would have made sense.) It was that they literally could not see anything out there as if the ships were invisible to them because they had never seen anything like it before. Think about that. The first time an airplane flew in the sky, would people have not been able to see it?

    The movie claimed that quantum physics allows for all these "strange" things to happen. It doesn't; they couldn't be more wrong about that. If you actually did affect your surroundings by "wishing intensely," then something else was at work that science doesn't understand. But it wasn't quantum physics and it wasn't in the way described in this movie.

  • Mulan
    Mulan
    I agree there were some major problems with the film, the least of which was using a well-known channeler as an authority

    That was the only thing that really bothered me. The film would have much more credibility without her on the list of experts.

    I thought the water thing was fascinating, and believable too.

    For myself, I am open to all new thoughts. I accept some, and discard others. With that film, I have experienced many of the things they mentioned, so understood what they were saying.

    Another thing about the Aztecs............... According to history, when they saw the sails of the ships, they thought they were giant birds, and when the Spanish came ashore on horses, they had never seen horses, so thought the man and horse were one creature. To me, that proves the point they were making in the movie. What you see in your mind, isn't necessarily what is actually there.

  • drwtsn32
    drwtsn32
    I thought the water thing was fascinating, and believable too.

    I don't remember the water thing...it's been a while since we saw this movie.

    For myself, I am open to all new thoughts.
    Well I like new ideas too, but not when it counters solid science and comes across as something well-supported by the scientific community.

    According to history, when they saw the sails of the ships, they thought they were giant birds, and when the Spanish came ashore on horses, they had never seen horses, so thought the man and horse were one creature.
    All that is reasonable and makes sense, but IMO it is *not* what they were saying in the movie. Unless I am remember incorrectly, they basically said the native Americans could not see *anything*.

    A while back I read a critique on this movie...I'm going to see if I can find it again. It showed that the "experts" were really not experts at all, and were just people into "new age philosophies" trying to push their ideas. If they want to do that, fine, but they shouldn't use quantum physics. Most people don't understand quantum physics and can't really refute what these "experts" claim... I think that's what they were counting on.

  • Brummie
    Brummie
    Sounds like a few PMs I've received lately.

    BT if that was a joke then its real funny but if it isnt then I'm sorry to hear that.

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