Former Jehovah's Witness admits: We targeted grief-stricken as 'ripe fruit'

by Londo111 13 Replies latest watchtower beliefs

  • Londo111
    Londo111

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/80708572/Former-Jehovahs-Witness-admits-We-targeted-grief-stricken-as-ripe-fruit

    Jehovah's Witnesses target grief and see the recently bereaved as "ripe fruit" for conversion, a former elder of the faith says.

    Vince and Michele Tylor​ spoke out after reading the story of Wellington woman Jean Sergent-Shadbolt, who received a handwritten letter from a Jehovah's Witness three months to the day after her step-cousin, friend and flatmate died.

    A current senior elder of the faith says it has no policy to target grieving, and those who do so are acting on their own initiative. However, he concedes such people may feel guided by Jehovah's Witness literature.

    But Vince Tylor said he knew of members who would trawl though obituaries to find grieving people, or visit cemeteries.

    "Not only do we see Watchtower printed material suggesting and supporting writing letters from obituaries such as what Jean received, but we even have reports and articles of encouragement for JWs to go to cemeteries to look for people as well."

    Jehovah Witness literature talks of the value of "witnessing" at cemeteries, such as the woman in Chile who wasconverted at her 12-year-old son's grave, through to the multiple sclerosis-suffering Witness who goes through obituaries to find relatives to write to.

    As far back as 1938, a Jehovah's Witness car equipped with sound equipment travelled between cemeteries in Brazil, a 2016 edition of Watchtower said.

    "On All Souls' Day, the sound car went from cemetery to cemetery playing the records Where Are the Dead?,Jehovah, and Riches, reaching over 40,000 mourners."

    Jehovah's Witness senior elder Jason Piscopo​, from Sydney, said the faith did not dictate to its members how they spread the word. While door-to-door was its trademark, there were other accepted ways too.

    Literature that discussed people going through obituaries or visiting cemeteries did not amount to a directive, but was instead "there to show what others had done".

    It would be "inaccurate" to claim the faith targeted any one group within society, he said.

    Tylor, who lives in Hawaii, said he left the faith via an official letter a decade ago after becoming aware of what he called its flip-flopping on life-saving measures such as vaccination and organ donation.

    His wife whom he met through the faith, was initially reluctant to leave, but eventually did. Two of their three children also left, but their eldest stayed, and effectively disowned his parents.

    When Michele Tylor saw her 10-year-old grandson out preaching recently, "he didn't even know me", she said.

    The Jehovah's Witness website says "disfellowshipped" former members are not to be ostracised by still-believing family members.

    GRIEF TARGETING: THE ULTIMATE COLD CALL

    Massey University history professor Peter Lineham, who specialises in New Zealand religion, said "grief targeting" was the ultimate cold-call.

    He compared preying on emotionally vulnerable people and identifying mourners from death notices as similar to thieves stealing from houses they knew were unoccupied because the residents were at a wedding or a funeral.

    The faith typically had weaker control over its members than other religions, and pushed members to take the initiative in soliciting conversions.

    "Jehovah's Witnesses quite manifestly encourage members to seek every opportunity they can. There are very few guidelines around what they can and can't do."

    There was no authority in New Zealand that could deal with complaints around grief targeting.

    The Advertising Standards Authority could possibly tackle complaints, but they would be hard to stack up, he said. Even though an argument could made that business was being solicited, the only transaction was in the "currency of faith".

  • Londo111
    Londo111

    Theocratic warfare is on display and the journalists and non-JW experts seem to fall for it. In particular, I have a gripe about this: 'The Jehovah's Witness website says "disfellowshipped" former members are not to be ostracised by still-believing family members.'

    Watchtower's careful wording on this and other subjects is evil genius PR.

  • keyser soze
    keyser soze

    A current senior elder of the faith says it has no policy to target grieving, and those who do so are acting on their own initiative. However, he concedes such people may feel guided by Jehovah's Witness literature.

    Funny how their "official" policy often differs from what's in their literature, and what's promoted at meetings.

  • OneEyedJoe
    OneEyedJoe

    The faith typically had weaker control over its members than other religions, and pushed members to take the initiative in soliciting conversions.

    I don't understand what they're saying here.

    It's cool to see an article that's relatively well researched, complete with links to their publications. I just wish that if they're going to point to the shunning FAQ they would've done the same research in the online publications and pointed out the contradiction.

  • Londo111
    Londo111

    Also this: "the faith did not dictate to its members how they spread the word."

    What on earth?

  • DesirousOfChange
    DesirousOfChange

    Obviously(TM), WTS does not consider lying to be a sin.

    Doc

  • William Penwell
    William Penwell

    I am not trying to defend the WT but I recall a number of years ago how some sister got my ex wife to go through the news paper obituary and write to people who had just lost a loved one. After one elder told my ex that this was frowned on by the WT but then like everything else when it comes to the WT, it is possible their policies have changed on this issue.

  • OneEyedJoe
    OneEyedJoe
    I am not trying to defend the WT but I recall a number of years ago how some sister got my ex wife to go through the news paper obituary and write to people who had just lost a loved one. After one elder told my ex that this was frowned on by the WT but then like everything else when it comes to the WT, it is possible their policies have changed on this issue.

    That's the sort of thing that will vary from congregation to congregation based on the elders. Since there's no official encouragement to do this (yes, there are examples given, but I'm not aware of it being actually encouraged that JWs do this - i.e. nothing in the KM suggesting it as a method for preaching like they do letter writing or phone calling in general), it will depend on the individual elders and how they balance the urgency of preaching against the need to be considerate to non-believers. Some elders will see that this practice probably will put off more than it'll recruit and others are going to be driven solely by the possibility of reaching that one person at the moment they are most vulnerable have the right heart condition.

  • Londo111
    Londo111

    Rank and file JWs are not to blame for the practice...they are doing what they are taught in an effort to "get their time in" and avoid "bloodguilt". Watchtower might step back with a wink and disavow it, but the rank and file only do what they are taught.

  • stuckinarut2
    stuckinarut2

    Wow...we all know the reality of how these things work, and yet the "official" reply misdirects truth... (aka: Lies)

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