WT BLOOD GUILT EXPOSED TO THE WORLD

by DannyHaszard 185 Replies latest watchtower medical

  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Mangalore: Beating heart surgery without blood transfusion performed
    Mangalorean.com, India - 4 hours ago Mr Barnes, a follower of Jehovah’s Witnesses. TheJehovah’s Witnesses urges its members to refuse to accept blood transfusions and to not allow them to be ... Mangalore June 24: The cardiac surgeons of KMC, Manipal have performed a successful beating heart surgery on a 57- year-old Peter Barnes (Director, Barnes Sifang Agro Engineering Pvt Ltd Shimoga). According to a press release, he was admitted to Kasturba Hospital, Manipal with complaints of Exertional Angina (chest pain or discomfort that occurs when your heart muscle does not get enough blood) and hypertension . An angiogram confirmed two vessel coronary artery disease of LAD and RCA by Dr Padma Kumar R, Chief Interventional Cardiologist, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal. Mr Barnes, a follower of Jehovah’s Witnesses. The Jehovah’s Witnesses urges its members to refuse to accept blood transfusions and to not allow them to be given to their children. Mr Barnes was operated by a team of Cardiac Surgeons headed by Dr Sujeeth H Suvarna, Consultant Cardio-thoracic Surgeon, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal by using octopus IV stabilizer and starfish suction devise to position the heart along with an intra-coronary shunt to by-pass the block in the proximal LAD and mid RCA. A beating heart Surgery was performed without any blood transfusion. DHNS

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  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Japan deals blow to Jehovah's Witnesses comment Earthtimes.org - 7 minutes ago
    TOKYO , June 24 Japan's top medical groups say children under the age of 15 should receive blood transfusions even if their parents are Jehovah's Witnesses. ...

    Japan deals blow to Jehovah's Witnesses comment United Press International - 9 minutes ago
    The committee found it would be an abuse of parental rights to allow Jehovah's Witnesses to make such crucial decisions for their children. ... TOKYO , June 24 Japan's top medical groups say children under the age of 15 should receive blood transfusions even if their parents are Jehovah's Witnesses.

    A committee representing the five medical societies created a draft guideline that would supersede a parent's religious beliefs to ensure a child undergoing surgery receives any needed blood transfusions, the Yomiuri Shimbun said Sunday.

    The committee found it would be an abuse of parental rights to allow Jehovah's Witnesses to make such crucial decisions for their children.

    Before the guideline is finalized, the committee will meet with representatives from the religious group and several bioethicists later this year.

    The committee's ruling added to a previous guideline that mandated such potentially life-saving procedures to any patients under the age of 12.

    The newspaper said under the new guideline, patients between the ages of 15 and 17 could avoid a blood transfusion if they and their parents reject the procedure.
  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Blood infusion guidelines for Jehovah's Witnesses compiledread comments Japan Today - Jun 24 3:14 PM TOKYO — Due to refusal for blood infusion by Jehovah's Witnesses, a joint panel of five medical academies has compiled a draft proposal to infuse blood into patients younger than 15 years old even if their parents involved in the religious group are against it, the panel members said Sunday.

  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Blood infusion steps for Jehovah's Witness kids in works
    The Japan Times, Japan -2 hours ago
    The proposals follow the death last month of a female Jehovah's Witness at Osaka Medical College who refused a blood transfusion after undergoing a ... Tuesday, June 26, 2007
    Blood infusion steps for Jehovah's Witness kids in works Kyodo News A joint panel of five medical academies has drafted proposals for providing blood to patients younger than age 15 even if their parents argue it's against their religion, particularly if they are Jehovah's Witnesses. The proposals follow the death last month of a female Jehovah's Witness at Osaka Medical College who refused a blood transfusion after undergoing a Caesarean section.

    Under the 1998 guideline regarding patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses, the Japan Society of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy says doctors should infuse blood into patients who are younger than 12 years old regardless of their parents' objections, while respecting the wishes of patients who are over the age of 18. During the latest debate, the panel concluded it will constitute abuse of parental authority if parents refuse blood infusions for offspring younger than 15 because such children do not have sufficient self-determining capability, according to Hitoshi Oto, a professor at Fukushima Medical University who heads the panel.

  • hawkaw
    hawkaw

    There are some great articles ont he JWs insane partial blood ban.

    Thanks for keeping this thread alive!

  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Ex-Jehova's Witness launches help website
    The Argus.co.uk, UK - 1 8 minutes ago
    There are about 125000 Jehovah's Witnesses in Britain and more than six million worldwide, including tennis stars Serena and Venus Williams and musicians ... Ex-Jehova's Witness launches help website
    The Argus.co.uk, UK - 57 minutes ago
    Rachel, of Telscombe Cliffs, has revealed the decision was taken out of her hands by the dictates of the Jehovah's Witness hospital liaison committee. ... http://www.exjw-reunited.co.uk/ Ex-Jehova's Witness launches help website By Simon Barrett features@theargus.co.uk

    Rachel Underhill with twins Zoe and Kira

    A mother who says she was forced to refuse a lifesaving blood transfusion while giving birth to twins has lifted the lid on life as a Jehovah's Witness. Rachel Underhill and her daughters Kira and Zoe survived to tell the tale - and left the faith a few years later. The 32-year-old is now dedicating herself to helping former members of the religion and has launched a website to provide support to ex-Witnesses. Seven years ago Rachel's case made headlines in The Argus when she rejected a blood transfusion during a caesarean section. Rachel, of Telscombe Cliffs, has revealed the decision was taken out of her hands by the dictates of the Jehovah's Witness hospital liaison committee. She said: "I was basically told in no uncertain terms that I could not have the transfusion. It was so scary. I was terrified they would let my babies die." Rachel's parents had been converted at the doorstep when she was aged three. She went on to marry David, a fellow member, but doubts had begun to set in. She said: "My sister got pregnant at 16 and was ignored by the church at the one time she needed support. I just didn't want myself or my children near these hypocritical people." In 2004, Rachel eventually faked having an affair with an old friend, knowing she would be driven out of the religion. She said: "Looking back to that day, I know I did the right thing. Mine and my children's lives are so much better and happier." A year after leaving the religion Rachel fell in love with Gerry D'Ambrosio - and they are now engaged. There are about 125,000 Jehovah's Witnesses in Britain and more than six million worldwide, including tennis stars Serena and Venus Williams and musicians Prince and Hank Marvin. Followers accept medical and surgical treatment but believe blood transfusion is forbidden in the Bible. Rachel added: "I decided to start this website to help people who have either experienced or who are experiencing the same things." Paul Gillies, spokesman for Jehovah's Witnesses, said: "The hospital liaison committee is there to help. "Jehovah's Witnesses who choose not to have a blood transfusion have to sign to prove they do not want one and the committee is only there for support. "It would never force someone into refusing a blood transfusion." Rachel's website is at www.exjw-reunited.co.uk http://www.exjw-reunited.co.uk/ CHECK OUT Rachel's SITE Rachel you are a heroine after my own heart Simon Barrett features@theargus.co.uk write reporter

  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Verghese Q&A: Understanding suffering is key
    San Antonio Express, TX - 2 hours ago
    You're a Jehovah'sWitness, you've just had a baby, your hemoglobin has dropped from 14 to 2, you're going to die because you're bleeding and you won't ... Q. What would be an example of an ethical dilemma that faces doctors today? A. One of the cardinal principles of ethics is patient autonomy. You're a Jehovah's Witness, you've just had a baby, your hemoglobin has dropped from 14 to 2, you're going to die because you're bleeding and you won't accept a blood transfusion. But I have to accept your patient autonomy, and it goes in conflict with my desire to be beneficial. Oftentimes, you can find a rationale that works for them, for example if it's their parents' blood it might be all right for them. Same scenario but this is a minor child who is bleeding and the parents decline for the child to be transfused. Well, there we can step in. Our beneficence — our desire to help that patient — outweighs the parents' autonomy. The parents have the right to decide for that child, but you could go to a justice of the peace and say this child is not yet an autonomous being, has not subscribed fully to this belief and therefore should not lose their life over this. dfinley@express-news.net medical editor asantana@express-news.net Religion editor

  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Trauma - Life in the E.R . - This is a 15 minute video clip documenting the story of a San Antonio, Texas (U.S.A.) Jehovah's Witness couple who were involved in a serious automobile accident. They requested and received Watchtower approved "bloodless" medical treatment. Both husband and wife died. Real Media player is required.

    Got to see it!

  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Patient safety watchdog calls for standardised wristbands
    Guardian Unlimited, UK - 4 hours ago
    In others green and yellow are used to signify a confused person, and Jehovah's Witnesses not wanting blood products can be either red or blue. ...

    Patient safety watchdog calls for standardised wristbands

    · Confusions led to nearly 3,000 treatment errors
    · NHS trusts given July 2008 date to fall into line

    David Pallister
    Thursday July 12, 2007
    The Guardian
    Nearly 3,000 hospital patients were given the wrong treatment last year because of inaccurate or confusing information on their identification wristband, according to the National Patient Safety Agency. The results, the agency said, could be potentially devastating, especially in surgery. In one mix-up a diabetic patient was given an almost fatal dose of insulin. The agency, a special health authority established to coordinate the reporting of patient safety incidents, has told NHS trusts to standardise both the colour and data on the bands by July next year. Its survey of 62 trusts found eight different coloured bands in use and some departments within trusts using bands of different colours to signify the same condition. Illegible writing on bands is one cause of confusion for doctors and nurses. The agency also notes that eight of the trusts could not be identified on the returned questionnaires because of "missing or illegible information". In the questionnaires, staff from nine trusts gave inconsistent replies to whether colour coding was used: seven responded "yes" and "no." One said "yes" and "don't know" and one gave all three responses. There were a small number of "don't knows" to nearly every question. The range of colour codes was illustrated by the use of four colours in different hospitals for "risk of falls": green, blue, yellow and orange. In others green and yellow are used to signify a confused person, and Jehovah's Witnessesnot wanting blood products can be either red or blue. The NPSA said the bands in future should be white with black text, carrying the last name, first name, date of birth and NHS number. Trusts will have the discretion to use red bands to denote a specific risk such as an allergy or a patient who does not want to receive blood products. The words, preferably in a common sans serif typeface such as Helvetica, should be in black on a white panel. Helen Glenister, the NPSA deputy chief executive, said: "We are issuing this advice to NHS organisations to encourage the standardisation of wristbands. This will help frontline staff who work in different NHS hospitals across England and Wales to make patient care safer. Wristbands are an important safety check in patient identification but do not take away the need for clinicians to check identification directly with patients. In cases where patients are unable to provide their own details because they are critically ill, unconscious, confused or cannot communicate, wristbands provide a vital backup." In Wales, the wristbands will also carry the first line of the patient's address. The NPSA said trusts must also "develop clear and consistent processes, set out in trust protocols, specifying which staff can produce, apply and check patient wristbands, how they should do it and what information sources they should use". By July 2009 bands should be made and printed at the patient's bedside "wherever possible".

  • DannyHaszard
    DannyHaszard

    Jehovah’s Witness refuses life-saving transfusion
    Think Spain , Spain - 9 minutes ago
    Whilst medics consulted her paperwork, they discovered she was a Jehovah’s Witness, which prevents her from having a blood transfusion in the event of an ... Religion

    Jehovah’s Witness refuses life-saving transfusion By: Samantha Kett, thinkSPAINtoday
    A Dénia woman who is seriously ill after an accident at work has refused a blood transfusion on the grounds of religion. The 35-year-old suffered head and stomach injuries whilst at work on the industrial estate in Ondara, in a firm that deals with wood-lacquering. She was pushing a large wheelbarrow loaded with planks of wood which overturned and fell on her. Witnesses say she was bleeding profusely from the mouth and her colleagues took her to accident and emergency. Whilst medics consulted her paperwork, they discovered she was a Jehovah’s Witness, which prevents her from having a blood transfusion in the event of an accident or illness. María Dolores Ortiz was taken to the Centro de Rehabilitación de Levante, in Valencia , where her injuries were operated on. Her six brothers and sisters were warned that she may not survive if she did not have a transfusion. However, medics refused to go against the patient’s wishes. They referred the matter to her family, who took the same line. Last Wednesday, a judge ratified the patient’s refusal to take a transfusion. In the meantime, she remains in intensive care and her life hangs in the balance.
    Friday, July 13, 2007

    http://www.thinkspain.com/info/contact.asp online form contact page

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