Does The Multiverse Really Exist? (Shrinking Jehovah To Insignificance)

by Brokeback Watchtower 14 Replies latest jw friends

  • Brokeback Watchtower
  • prologos
    prologos

    let us suppose there is a multiverse that was made from nothing, since nothing has zero size, unless the multiverse made itself, the making maker must at that zero point in time have been bigger than the embryonic multiverse, but by how much? if that maker is eternal, he is infinitely older and larger. so:

    The wt/bible god, the walker in the garden of eden might have become proportionally smaller, the creator only bigger, the bigger the multiverse, the bigger it's creator.or?

  • smiddy
    smiddy

    I can see some Aliens in these bubbles from the centre start button actually he appears in the four blue bubbles.

    Is that Jah in Multiverse existence ? It looks more like some being out of Star Trek.

  • Vidiot
    Vidiot

    Does the Multiverse theory suggest that somewhere, in some strange parallel-existence/alternate-reality...

    ...the WTS doesn't exist? :smirk:

  • sir82
    sir82

    Does the Multiverse theory suggest that somewhere, in some strange parallel-existence/alternate-reality...

    ...the WTS doesn't exist? :smirk:

    There are several "flavors" of multiverse theory. Some of them posit infinite multiverses, each one slightly different than the next.

    Just our luck, we got stuck with this one.

  • Vidiot
    Vidiot
    sir82 - "...Just our luck, we got stuck with this one."

    "...grumblegrumblegrumblestoopidf**kingblindchancegrumblegrumblegrumble..."

  • GLTirebiter
    GLTirebiter

    the making maker must at that zero point in time have been bigger than the embryonic multiverse, but by how much?

    That assumes a materialist point of view, that the creator would be of the same substances (matter, energy, space, time) as the things created. When you accept that speaking of God in anthropomorphic terms as a metaphor catering the limitations of human understanding, you can recognize a creator who does not occupy space and time, the creator who made the space-time continuum, i.e. is the ultimate cause of its existence.

  • prologos
    prologos
    GLT: "-That assumes a materialist point of view, that the creator would be of the same substances (matter, energy, space, time) as the things created.

    not really, it assumes only that the first dimension, time, is fundamental and eternal.

    The supposed creator of the multiverse would appropriately totally extend in that eternal dimension, but not moving through it,- as we do. He would always be bigger=older as his creation. no matter how big it gets. whereas the OP argues, that

    a bigger creation= multiverse would shrink the creator by comparison.

    Time is a dimension, what we experience is movement through time.

    What really has shrunk is our ego , because we assumied we were quite significant, in the days the bible was written. We still live in the center of the universe though, but not the supposed multiverse.

  • Village Idiot
    Village Idiot

    Vidiot,

    Does the Multiverse theory suggest that somewhere, in some strange parallel-existence/alternate-reality...

    ...the WTS doesn't exist? :smirk:

    So long as human nature is what it is now there will always be something like the WTS.

  • Brokeback Watchtower
    Brokeback Watchtower

    Hey our universe might a 2 dimensional sphere and our perceived three dimension a hologram.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/29/space-hologram-experiment-two-dimensions_n_5726262.html

    Everyone knows the universe exists in three dimensions, right? Maybe not. For some time now serious physicists have been pondering the seemingly absurd possibility that three-dimensional space is merely an illusion—and that we actually live in a two-dimensional “hologram.”
    And now scientists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois have launched a mind-blowing experiment to show once and for all what sort of universe we live in.
    “We want to find out whether space-time is a quantum system just like matter is,” Dr. Craig Hogan, director of Fermilab’s Center for Particle Astrophysics, said in a written statement. “If we see something, it will completely change ideas about space we’ve used for thousands of years.”
    According to quantum theory’s uncertainty principle, it’s impossible to know both the precise location and the exact velocity of a subatomic particle. If the same uncertainty principle applies to space as well as to matter, space too should have built-in fluctuations—a.k.a. “quantum jitter” or “holographic noise,” according to the statement.
    The 21 scientists involved in the experiment will look for the jitter with the help of an exquisitely sensitive device known as a Holometer. It produces laser beams 200,000 times brighter than a laser pointer and, with the help of an optical technique known as interferometry, measures jitter in the beams as small as a few billionths of a billionth of a meter.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holographic_principle

    The holographic principle is a principle of string theories and a supposed property of quantum gravity that states that the description of a volume of space can be thought of as encoded on a lower-dimensional boundary to the region—preferably a light-like boundary like a gravitational horizon. First proposed by Gerard 't Hooft, it was given a precise string-theory interpretation by Leonard Susskind[1] who combined his ideas with previous ones of 't Hooft and Charles Thorn.[1][2] As pointed out by Raphael Bousso,[3] Thorn observed in 1978 that string theory admits a lower-dimensional description in which gravity emerges from it in what would now be called a holographic way.
    In a larger sense, the theory suggests that the entire universe can be seen as two-dimensional information on the cosmological horizon, the event horizon from which information may still be gathered and not lost due to the natural limitations of spacetime supporting a black hole, an observer and a given setting of these specific elements,[clarification needed] such that the three dimensions we observe are an effective description only at macroscopic scales and at low energies. Cosmological holography has not been made mathematically precise, partly because the particle horizon has a non-zero area and grows with time.[4][5]
    The holographic principle was inspired by black hole thermodynamics, which conjectures that the maximal entropy in any region scales with the radius squared, and not cubed as might be expected. In the case of a black hole, the insight was that the informational content of all the objects that have fallen into the hole might be entirely contained in surface fluctuations of the event horizon. The holographic principle resolves the black hole information paradox within the framework of string theory.[6] However, there exist classical solutions to the Einstein equations that allow values of the entropy larger than those allowed by an area law, hence in principle larger than those of a black hole. These are the so-called "Wheeler's bags of gold". The existence of such solutions conflicts with the holographic interpretation, and their effects in a quantum theory of gravity including the holographic principle are not yet fully understood.[7]

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