Have You Found Your Place in the World?

by Rainbow_Troll 34 Replies latest jw experiences

  • Iown Mylife
    Iown Mylife

    HI Rainbow, You inspired me to type "Find My Purpose in Life" in the browser.

    Try it! Lots of info popped up.

    Love and health to you.

  • waton
    waton

    yes, but trying to featherbed it better still.

  • LevelThePlayingField
    LevelThePlayingField

    Rainbow - just keep trying. I think if you keep looking you will find good friends. I was raised in the world till I was 27 years old and the world is not lost, just some people are. If you think all the young people are doing drugs then keep looking because there are plenty of youths that don't do drugs.

    Widen your circle, the world isn't empty, it's beautiful.

  • Saethydd
    Saethydd

    I'm in college and I've managed to find loads of friends that aren't addicted to drugs. (At least not as far as I know.) They seem to be fairly happy, most of them are probably Christian, but the two I've gotten the closest with are agnostic like me and very sympathetic to my current plight with my family. I would suggest you keep looking before you give up on people entirely.

  • Landy
    Landy

    I haven't been to a meeting a meeting for 20 years and associate with no witnesses, except family.

    Strangely enough I don't know any drug addicts. The people I associate with, both in social and work environments are honest and decent and are a lot less judgemental than any witnesses I used to know.

  • Rainbow_Troll
    Rainbow_Troll

    Thank you everyone for your thoughtful replies.

    Well, being in my early 30s I am not exactly young, but not old either. I tend to feel more rapport with those who are older than me: mostly people in their 50s and 60s. Yes, life definitely improves as you get older. I would not want to be 21 again; let alone a teenager!

    I do know a few people near to my age that aren't drug addicts, but they are just as alienated from society as me. Both are virtual shut-ins who only leave the house to get groceries. They are fun to hang out with, but they aren't going anywhere in life: no jobs, no girlfriends, no ambition at all.

    I really can't blame them, though. The jobs here are scarce, low-paying and terrible. Most of women are either overweight or they are tweakers (methamphetamine addicts) with missing teeth and lesions on their faces (they look a lot like zombies after a while).The only venues for socializing are sports bars and churches; but the bars aren't upscale pubs like Cheers, they are dank, dimly lit and so noisy you can't hear yourself speak.

    I guess I'm living in the wrong place but, at the moment, I can't afford to leave unless I want to be a hobo.

  • zeb
    zeb

    "passionate sex in the beginning followed swiftly by fighting, cheating and bitterness. Most people I know, in one way or another, are simply hedonists with no goals, ethics .."

    Sounds like the script for a lot of the soapies that seem to dominate a lot of peoples tv viewing. So many model their lives around this emptiness. I attended college at mature age and was really sickened by the Kleenex generation I had around me.

    Look wide, open up to things creative and there find like creative people.

  • Xanthippe
    Xanthippe
    Anyone else here stopped looking to make friends or stop trying to find a group or community. -LifesNotOver

    Yes I agree I find having lots of aqaintances works better for me. I socialize with work colleagues, birthdays, Christmas etc. I've joined several Meetup groups and we do meals, cinema, live music, pub quizzes. Also a book club once a month which has got me reading stuff I don't normally choose and we have a good chat about books online and at the club meeting.

    There's no pressure to go to meetups or the book club. Nobody gets upset if you don't go. People to talk to when you feel like it.

    Rainbow_Troll have you tried Meetup.com? Lots of groups of all ages and interests.

  • stillin
    stillin

    A congregation is a small universe, closed unto itself. Having an identity is easy. Being aware of problems that others may be going through is almost automatic; you can make yourself useful in some way just by being there. It's a little more difficult when you are out in the great wide open. The suggestion here about volunteering for various causes is a good one.

    Being aware of people around you and helping where you can, without being a busybody, will endear you to people.

    We tend to focus on our own problems. When we understand that a lot of people have it a lot worse than us it's easier to let go of our own stuff and lend a hand.

    One caution, some people ere users, and they will ALWAYS need you. That's no fun, either.

  • punkofnice
    punkofnice

    I don't know where my place is. I'd like to think there is something after I die...but I 99.999999999999% don't think there is.

    This being said; everything is trivialised by death. In 100 years time none of this will matter to us...we'll be long gone. Oblivion.

    After the sun explodes, or whatever destroys this planet, no aliens will fly by in their saucers and say, 'Hey, Punkofnice made a really good comment on that thread.'

    Finding joy in small things each day seems a hopeless task. Time is ticking faster and faster...I'm heading toward oblivion faster and faster. If I think that what I do is important, that's the biggest arrogance on my part.

    The WBT$ was right in as much as there is hopelessness out there, but they forget..............they never had a grip on reality from the start.

    I'd sooner face reality, as sickening as it is, than be a slave to a destructive, unloving, hateful and dishonest corporation that promises lies for money.