Grandson Came, Cleaned, Cooked

by snowbird 30 Replies latest jw friends

  • snowbird
    snowbird

    What fashionistas now refer to as polenta, we called it mush.

    Good stuff!

  • snowbird
    snowbird

    We called hominy, lye corn.

    More good stuff!

  • steve2
    steve2

    Anyone who dares use the word "grits" in New Zealand is at high risk of being labelled an American hillbilly.

    It is just not in our everyday lingo or diet.

  • ShirleyW
    ShirleyW

    I remember mush too ! Just yellow cornmeal meant to fill the stomach when there was not much else, now people think it's some gourmet thing, if they only knew.

  • compound complex
    compound complex

    I was puzzled regarding a line uttered by Ralph Fiennes in HOTEL BUDAPEST:

    "May I offer any of you inmates a plate of mush?"

    I was expecting him to say "porridge," given the background of the characters and setting. Well, the American "mush" was certainly funnier. Still, I was in conflict. We kids had mush nearly every day for breakfast back in the '50s. USA.

  • OUTLAW
    OUTLAW

    Grandson Came, Cleaned, Cooked.....Sylvia

    "I Came, I Cleaned, I Cooked."

    "FOR MY GRANDMA!"

    Image result for Black Chef

  • Simon
    Simon

    Grits just don't sound good or appetizing.

    I think I've tried them when we were in the US but I think I added them to my "what is wrong with Americans, why are they like that?" list.

    If it was porridge, then yeah ... that's inedible mush, but with a Scottish accent.

  • smiddy
    smiddy

    In reference to your OP ,that sounds like a meal fit for a Queen.What a great grandson.

    However grits ? mush ? nixtamalization sounds like something we used to cull a plague of rabbits years ago.

    And that process CoCo seems like something to be avoided not eaten.

  • snowbird
    snowbird

    I appreciate the responses.

    Different strokes for different folks.

  • carla
    carla

    Midwesterner here, never had grits either. Went down south and still couldn't bring myself to have corn soaked in lye mush. It just doesn't seem right, using lye like that. In my mind lye is for making soap and highly caustic. Next time I get down south I will have to try it, southerners seem to love it.

    Glad you have such a nice grandson Snowbird!