Yes, the Watchtower Society is VERY much being investigated all over the world!

by Golden Earring 25 Replies latest watchtower scandals

  • Corney
    Corney

    Both "news" mentioned in the OP are fake ones

  • LV101
    LV101

    "fake ones" - why do peeps make up this stuff! I couldn't imagine JWs running out and stockpiling firearms. No wonder JWs don't believe any rumors going around about their cult when nonsense is always flying -- just pathetic!

  • Crazyguy2
    Crazyguy2

    Who even listens to this Rick guy? He’s always been off his rocker. Just look at his fake studio. He’s probably a JW plant to make all apostates look crazy.

  • joe134cd
    joe134cd

    Absolute rubbish. If there is some truth to it I’d say it’s some individual crazy person who has latched onto the JWs.

  • Dagney
    Dagney

    Oh my god, this guy.

  • Listener
    Listener

    The Youtube is over 7 months old.

  • Golden Earring
    Golden Earring

    Crazyguy2 19 hours ago said:

    “Who even listens to this Rick guy? He’s always been off his rocker. Just look at his fake studio. He’s probably a JW plant to make all apostates look crazy.”

    Along with all the other “JW plants” or Watchtower Operatives who posted in the last day since my last posting I say this:

    Whatever you have to tell yourselves…but “Where’s the Beef?” I have the Watchtower Society on my computer again this morning which I will deal with momentarily as the ONGOING investigation needs to be reported but you provide nothing but rhetoric and trash talk…refute the evidence if you dare!

    https://www.theworldnewsmedia.org/forums/topic/52842-pastor-russell-and-miracle-wheat/

    Russell must have thought that "Miracle Wheat" was an aphrodisiac...he put it to the test with Rose Ball:


    https://www.revolvy.com/page/Charles-Taze-Russell

    "And that's all I have to say about that" ~ Forrest Gump

  • Golden Earring
    Golden Earring

    Hey, It’s either true or it isn’t…all the smack talk in the world won’t change a thing!:

    https://archive.org/details/WatchtowerAndTheMasons

    also:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehovah%27s_Witnesses_splinter_groups

    and:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventism

    Other relationships

    The Bible Students movement founded by Charles Taze Russell had in its early development close connections with the Millerite movement and stalwarts of the Adventist faith, including George Storrs and Joseph Seiss. The various groupings of independent Bible Students has currently have a cumulative membership about less than 20,000 worldwide. Although both Jehovah's Witnesses and Bible Students do not categorize themselves as part of the Millerite Adventist movement (or other denominations, in general), some theologians do categorize the group and schisms as Millerite Adventist because of its teachings regarding an imminent Second Coming and use of specific dates. –“As of January 2014 there are approximately 8 million Jehovah's Witnesses worldwide.” (Self reported)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible_Student_movement

    Associated Bible Students

    The Associated Bible Students groups, which adhere to Charles Taze Russell's teachings, include the Independent Bible Students, Stand Fast Bible Students and Dawn Bible Students. Congregations are autonomous, and may not necessarily have contact with other congregations, though many do. The Dawn Bible Students collectively form the largest segment of the Bible Student movement separate from the Watch Tower Society.[65]

    Pastoral Bible Institute

    In 1918, the former directors held the first Bible Student Convention independent of the Watch Tower Society. At the second convention a few months later, the informal Pastoral Bible Institute was founded. They began publishing The Herald of Christ's Kingdom, edited by Randolph E. Streeter. An editorial committee continues publication of the magazine[66] in a reduced capacity, and reproduces other Bible Student movement literature, including Russell's six-volume Studies in the Scriptures.[65]

    Berean Bible Institute

    The Australian Berean Bible Institute (BBI) formally separated from the Watch Tower Society in 1918. It published The Voice, and continues to publish the People's Paper magazine. There are several 'classes' of Bible students in Australia that hold similar beliefs to those promulgated by the BBI, but there is no official affiliation. Two conventions are held annually in Anglesea, Victoria and Alexandra Headlands, Queensland. There is no official creed; members are allowed to come to their own conclusions regarding interpretations of the Bible; the role of fellowship is to provide mutual help and stimulation. The number of Bible Students in Australia is estimated at approximately 100.[67]

    Stand Fast Bible Students Association

    In December 1918, Charles E. Heard and others considered[citation needed] Rutherford's indifference[68] regarding the purchase of war bonds to be a perversion of Russell's pacifist teachings, and contrary to scripture.[69] As a result, they founded the Stand Fast Bible Students Association in Portland, Oregon, USA. The name originated from their decision to "stand fast" on principles involving war that Russell had espoused. Membership dwindled and the group was eventually disbanded. A splinter group known as the Elijah Voice Society, was founded by John A. Herdersen and C. D. McCray in 1923. They were especially noted for their preaching and pacifist activity.[citation needed]

    Dawn Bible Students Association

    Main article: Dawn Bible Students Association

    See also: Frank and Ernest (broadcast)

    In 1928, Norman Woodworth, cousin of Clayton J. Woodworth, left the Watch Tower Society after having been in charge of their radio ministry. Woodworth created an independent Bible Students radio program called Frank and Ernest.[70] Funding was provided by the Brooklyn congregation of Bible Students and broadcasting continued into the 1980s. In 1929 the station sponsored the First Annual Reunion Convention of Bible Students at the old Bible House used by Russell in Pittsburgh.

    In 1931 Woodworth and others founded the Dawn Bible Students Association to resume publication of Studies in the Scriptures, which the Watch Tower Society had officially ceased printing in 1927. The Dawn Bible Students published a leaflet, The Bible Students Radio Echo, to follow up interest in the radio program. The leaflet was soon developed into a 16-page magazine and renamed The Dawn—A Herald of Christ's Presence, which they continue to publish, along with radio, television, and Internet radio programs.[70]

    Independent Bible Students

    This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

    Over the past thirty-five years, controversy surrounded the Dawn Bible Students Association as their publishing and editorial committee began to promote more-liberal points of view, distancing themselves from some of Russell's viewpoints, alienating many Bible Students as a result.[citation needed] In 1974, a group of Bible Students meeting at a convention in Fort Collins, Colorado formally ceased their spiritual fellowship with, and financial support of, the Dawn Bible Students Association. They refer to themselves as Independent Bible Students. The split was not intended to eliminate or restrict personal fellowship, but was viewed as a "stand for the truth"[citation needed] by ceasing sponsorship of elders associated with the Dawn Bible Students, and avoiding attendance at their conventions. In recent years, attempts have been made to reintegrate the groups. The Independent Bible Students publishes a non-doctrinal magazine, The Bible Students Newsletter.[citation needed]

    Free Bible Students

    Main article: Free Bible Students

    The Free Bible Students separated very early from the Watchtower Society, as Russell began to change some teachings.

    New Covenant Believers

    In 1909, Matthew L. McPhail, a traveling elder ("Pilgrim") and member of the Chicago Bible Students, disassociated from Russell's movement when controversy arose over Russell's expanded view of the application and timing of the "New Covenant" mentioned by Jeremiah, and led the New Covenant Bible Students in the United States, founding the New Covenant Believers in that year. The community, which members informally refer to as Free Bible Students, published The Kingdom Scribe magazine until 1975.[71] The founding group is now known as the Berean Bible Students Church in Lombard.[72]

    Christian Discipling Ministries International

    In 1928 the Italian Bible Students Association[clarification needed] in Hartford, Connecticut withdrew its support from the Watch Tower Society and changed its name to the Millennial Bible Students Church or Christian Millennial Fellowship and later to Christian Discipling Ministries International. They came to reject many of Russell's writings as erroneous. Now located in New Jersey, the group is known as the Free Bible Students; it has published The New Creation magazine since 1940.[71]

    Free Bible Students Association

    Conrad C. Binkele the former Branch Manager of Watchtower Society founded in 1928 the community of "Free Bible Students Association" in the German region (Germany, Austria, Switzerland) with other brethren and began publishing "Der Pilgrim" a religious magazine from 1931 to 1934. Free Bible Students in Germany were persecuted during World War II. Only after the war were rehabilitated in the Bible Students and approved the publication again.

    Jehovah's Witnesses

    Main article: Jehovah's Witnesses

    Bible Students who submitted to Rutherford's leadership of the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society became known as Jehovah's witnesses in 1931. The Watch Tower Society remains the denomination's primary administrative body, and their beliefs and organizational structure have diverged considerably from Russell's.[73] Their literature states that Bible Students is the former name for their group,[74] and does not acknowledge the continued existence of other Bible Student groups. In 1955, the Watch Tower Society claimed that those who separated from the movement during Rutherford's presidency constituted the "evil slave" of Matthew 24:48-51.[75] (The Society altered its view in 2013, calling the "evil slave" a hypothetical warning to the 'faithful slave'.[76]) Jehovah's Witnesses report worldwide membership of over 8 million.[77]

    Laymen's Home Missionary Movement

    Main article: Laymen's Home Missionary Movement

    Paul S. L. Johnson founded the Laymen's Home Missionary Movement in 1919. Johnson's death in 1950 led to an internal disagreement over his role as a teacher chosen by God, and resulted in the formation of new splinter groups, such as the Epiphany Bible Students Association, and the Laodicean Home Missionary Movement. Johnson believed he had been appointed by God as Russell's official spiritual successor, that he was the last member of the 144,000 of Revelation 7, and that hope of a heavenly reward of immortality for the Christian faithful would cease after his death. His associate and successor, Raymond Jolly, taught that he himself was the last member of the "great multitude", also of Revelation 7. After Jolly's death, remaining members of the fellowship believed they would live on a perfected earth in God's kingdom as a group referred to as the "modern worthies", as associates of the "ancient worthies"—the ancient Jewish prophets God would resurrect to guide and instruct the world in his kingdom.[citation needed]

    Other groups

    Friends of Man

    Main article: Friends of Man

    Alexander FL Freytag, manager of the branch office of the Watch Tower Society in Switzerland since 1898, had disagreed with Russell's teachings before Russell's death in 1916. He began publishing his own views using the Watch Tower Society's printing equipment in 1917, and was ousted from the Watch Tower Society by Rutherford in 1919. In 1920, Freytag founded the Angel of Jehovah Bible and Tract Society, also known as the Philanthropic Assembly of the Friends of Man and The Church of the Kingdom of God. He published two journals, the monthly The Monitor of the Reign of Justice and the weekly Paper for All.[78]

  • Diogenesister
    Diogenesister

    I think what Crazy guy means Golden earring, is that you don’t have to resort to Six Screens to find a plethora of information proving Watchtower are abject liars and scammers, as you have proven with much of what you’ve just posted. Just be a little more selective and rigorous with your reserch methods.

  • Diogenesister
    Diogenesister
    "And that's all I have to say about that" ~ Forrest Gump
    but “ where’s the beef?”
    All the trash talk in the world won’t change that!!

    Just want to say I love you! You’re a gas, and welcome to the forum!!

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