How many JW's believe to their last breath . .

by nicolaou 11 Replies latest jw friends

  • Doubtfully Yours
    Doubtfully Yours

    In my case, the minute I personally studied that magazine where they came up with the 'overlapping generations' version (1995), it all started looking and feeling like just men making stuff up as they went along.

    That was the moment when it was all over for me. From that point forward, I am here because I love my family and still care sincerely about quite a few of my friends, and know for sure I'll lose them if I jump ship completely.

    Although I must inform that this charade is becoming increasingly harder to sustain as old age is setting in.

    DY

  • nevermind
    nevermind

    JWs these days are an easily frightened bunch. Can't hold an honest conversation with one for more than a few times before he starts digging his head deeper into the sand and refuses to discuss further. I guess I ruffled his ever sensitive feathers by just innocently bringing up those many failed prophecies of the WTS over the past century, and then his "apostate" alarm set off.

    There are things like the whole overlapping generation and anointed class demoted to less glorious status that affect the older folks who've been JWs long enough to gauge the significance of these changes. But for those JWs who joined post-2000s and even more recent ones, it's hard to use these as punch lines to start awakening them to the WTS fallacies. I'm guessing they probably weren't in long enough to experience the status of the annointed class given by the WTS in the earlier chapters of its history. For one, jw.org is just the WTS attempt to rewrite its own history. With these challenges in mind, I'm not sure with whether a significant amount of the younger JWs (those that joined post-2000s) will be lifers or not. Time will tell how long this WTS decepticon can continue