Russell's Yacht the Angel

by wifibandit 7 Replies latest watchtower scandals

  • wifibandit
    wifibandit


  • nonjwspouse
    nonjwspouse
    wow, the stone witness, the Zionists.... good read!
  • fulltimestudent
    fulltimestudent

    Interesting news item.

    I personally would believe that the organisation at that time did use the boat to reach seaman.

    Some years before I was booted out, the JWs in Sydney were making big efforts to reach the crews of shipping that berthed in Sydney. A number of brothers were organised to do that. You had to approach the captain and attempt to be able to speak to the crew.

    Of course, that was years later than the above 1910 boat. But before that time, in the 1930s, the Aussie branch had a boat called the 'Lightbearer' that was used to witness through the Islands to the north and north-east of Australia, they also attempted to preach through the islands belonging to Indonesia (then controlled by the Dutch as part of their empire). There was also another boat (forget its name) that may have preached through S.E.Asia. Hard to know how effective it was, but that's not the point in "Christian" preaching is it?

    You go out and sow seed and YHWH/JESUS makes it grown.

    ----------------------------

    Hahahaha! I just thought I'd do a websearch for the lightbearer, and bloody hell! the 2016 year book on JW.com came up with the story.

    https://www.jw.org/en/publications/books/2016-yearbook/indonesia/radio-broadcasts-and-the-lightbearer/

    There's pik on the web-site, and one of the 'happy' preachers.

    I note that they used to use a powerful sound system on the boat (like the one they used in the sound cars) to preach to the locals.

    I have a funny story about the sound cars:

    The town of Gosford, just north of Sydney has a very large hill (mountain) on the east side of the town.

    The congregation I was part of then, was assigned to help the local Gosford cong. cover their territory faster. So I was going H2H and met this old lady. I gave the current D2D sermon and the old lady said, "I know all that!" "Oh!" I replied, "that's good." "Yes," she continued,"One sunday morning before the war, (WW2) I was woken up by this loud voice, I went outside and heard the loud voice coming from that mountain. It was God himself warning our town about what he was going to do."

    I told a local brother, and he laughed and explained that the brothers used to park a sound car at the top of that mountain, and broadcast sermons to the whole town.

  • wifibandit
    wifibandit
    Pastor Russell accepted the Angel, he said, not for himself, but as a trustee for the association.

    Why would the Peoples Pulpit Association need a Yacht to be held in trusteeship, if it was being used in ministerial service?

  • Londo111
    Londo111
    Hubbard had his boat...Russell had his. Too bad for Joseph Smith...there was no place for him to sail a yacht.
  • jaydee
    jaydee

    thanks so much 'wifi',... good find,

    It's so great to have all those old papers online these days,

    I just wish they would take a bit more time to scan them a bit clearer

  • betterdaze
    betterdaze
    About turn-of-the century naphtha yachts in Brooklyn:

    The popular size open boats of the middle nineties were the 16 footers, costing $650, the 25 footers, costing $1,050, or the 30 footer for $1,600, cash strictly. You could buy various sizes of cabin cruisers, or a 125 foot twin-screw beauty, with two 50 h.p. engines, 4 cylinders, using 25 quarts of naphtha an hour, for $22,000.

    — MotorBoating, February 1934

    $22K in 1910 when the Peoples’ Pulpit “gifted” the Angel to Russell is about $533,340 in 2016 dollars.

    A few paragraphs up:

    The first minister to own the new launch was the Rev. Frank Landon Humphries of Morristown, N.J., who ordered another innovation, a Daimler lighting plant installed in his 82 by 12 foot craft, run by two 24 h.p. engines, with twin screws.
    What a wimpy vessel compared to Pastor Russells’! Interesting that they note a Christian minister. Was this a trend?

    And a few paragraphs down:

    These pioneer boat-owners were for the most part… men of comfortable means; as yet the sport belonged to the more opulent.
    Gilded Age financiers like William Astor and industrialist Jay Gould are mentioned.
  • prologos
    prologos

    WB: this looks like a serious contender for the America Cup at the time. Practising Tacking maneuvers as in changing doctrines?

    L111, Joseph Smith's earlier vessels were the sturdy oak boats on which the 10 lost tribes of Israel came to America in ~ 700 BC. no?

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